Clogs

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Clogs' page

Derelict shop

By Valerie Saunders

I rather think I took this photograph in the 60s because I found it so fascinating; I think it was somewhere on Alfreton road, or around there.  I had never seen anything like it before - did people in Nottingham wear clogs?

Does anyone know anything about it?

Valerie

 

This page was added by Valerie Saunders on 29/06/2020.
Comments about this page

          Clays Shoe shop (Clogs).

                    My wife told me that she could remember this particular shop. It was around the corner from the school at the junction of Bentinck Road and Alfreton Road. It was on Bentinck road, in a little parade of shops before turning left to go down the hill on to Hyson Green.

          She can remember being taken by her mum to buy a pair of brown lace up shoes for school during the 1950s. Both me and my wife though cannot remember any one wearing clogs in our families.

          I have also rang her uncle Jack, who lived nearby and is now 97, if he could remember anyone wearing Clogs during his life. But he also could not specifically remember anyone, even with-in his own family using them.

          But he did say that he thought that some people must have. He said that they were supposed to be very comfortable and long lasting. This could have been aided by the fitting of steel “Segs” (a kind of steel stud) to the clogs sole and heel. This would help to make the distinctive sound when someone was walking along the pavement.

          Although he joked that being the youngest, like many in those days, would have had Hand – me – Down shoes or boots. They were previously used by his older siblings. He was the youngest and always had second hand shoes.

 In fact he remembers having shoes so worn down that there was no heel left and the leather in the heel support area was very soft due to being almost paper thin due to wear by his siblings.

One last thing. When reminiscing about this shoe and shop with Jack there were a few shoe shops in the area in those days. I can remember in the 1960s going to a shop we think it was named “Oldbury’s”. We thought that there was one on Hyson Green towards Gregory Boulevard and another on Denman Street, Radford. I always went there for the good service and the cost. But in my case and my dad’s it was to buy a particular brand of shoe. It was called “Cushy Numbers”. They had plastic soles and leather uppers. But with a real comfortable soft lining. Idea if you had to do a lot of walking in your work.

The types of shoe and the method of manufacture were changing which probably signalled the end of the small independent shoe shops and Clogs.

Unfortunately I could not add a lot of information about your enquiry about “Clays” shop and the wearing of Clogs. But hope this little anecdote is of interest.

John Pownall     

By Clays Shoe shop (Clogs).
On 13/07/2020

I've only just seen your post and was fascinated to read what you said.  I had only associated clogs with further north but I love the photograph I took of that shop all those years ago.

(Unconnected to the subject matter, my Mum had a friend called Pownall (can't remember her name at the moment) but we went to her home and I was very impressed by her white grand piano!)

By Valerie Saunders
On 11/08/2020

I've only just seen your post and was fascinated to read what you said.  I had only associated clogs with further north but I love the photograph I took of that shop all those years ago.

(Unconnected to the subject matter, my Mum had a friend called Pownall (can't remember her name at the moment) but we went to her home and I was very impressed by her white grand piano!)

By Valerie Saunders
On 13/08/2020

Thank you for your very informative reply. How things have changed. As the famous sketch remarked: "The kids of today, they'd never believe it!"

By Valerie Saunders
On 11/08/2020

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