1918; Armistice at Mansfield

"To have lived for this was worth what we have passed through"

From The Mansfield Reporter, 15th November 1918

 

The receipt of the news that the Germans had signed ath armistice caused no little excitement in the town on Monday morning.  It was between 10 and 11 o’clock when the intelligence was received by telephone, and although everyone was anticipating it, when it actually came corroboration was wanted before it was believed.  However, when the newspaper offices announced that the good news was ‘official’, the announcement spread like wildfire, and very soon the streets were thronged with a merry cheering crowd.

 What a relief to many who were expecting almost hourly to go out again into the hell on the Western front.

  • The school children were released from their studies, and they came cheering along the streets…. St.Peter’s youngsters  ran excitedly down the road  after they had tested their lungs, and waving their arms ran home with the good news to their mothers

 

  • At the Town Hall and other public buildings flags were soon run up the poles, and the tradespeople quickly followed the example…..

 

  • Employees at the various works in the town very soon ‘downed tools’ , but with the consent of their employers, and the mill girls marched about the streets singing and flag waving.

 

  • Soldiers who were released from camp fairly let themselves go.  They marched in platoons through the principal thoroughfares , chanting army ditties, and carrying …. Flags.

 

  • The church bells rang a carillion at the Parish Church, and everywhere was joy and thankfulness to be found

 

  • At Clipstone Camp the men were delirious with delight.  The bands were brought out, and each battalion was parade (sic) and the pregnant message read out to them.  They cheered and sang and cheered again.  What a relief to many who were expecting almost hourly to go out again into the hell on the Western front.  No wonder that many acted like happy irresponsible schoolboys.

 

“To have lived for this was worth what we have passed through” said one soldier lad with a couple of wounded bars on his left arm, and he meant it.

 

It was all very wonderful, glorious, and those who were privileged to witness the camp scenes will never forget them.

 

 

This page was added by Website Administrator on 27/09/2018.

If you're already a registered user of this site, please login using the form on the left-hand side of this page.