The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'The Turner Memorial Hall, Mansfield Woodhouse' page

Keith Morris

Margaret Morris

The Turner Memorial Hall is so named in memory of Frederick John Turner, who was the Land Agent for the Welbeck Estates, after giving a total of forty eight years service to the 5th and 6th Dukes of Portland.

Mr. Turner was aware that there had long been need of a room for parochial purposes in Mansfield Woodhouse and he put the idea before the Duke of Portland who gave a valuable piece of land at the junction of Church Street and Welbeck Road for this.

Sadly Mr. Turner died on March 10th 1906 before the room reached an advanced stage, but it was felt that the hall should be named after him.

 The foundation stone to start building work in May 1907 was laid by Miss Emily Need who lived at the Manor House next door to St. Edmund’s Church, and the Parish Room was officially opened in February 1908 by His Grace, The Duke of Portland.

In July, 1924 the foundation stone for the larger hall was laid by his Grace The Duke of Portland in memory of Emily Cunynghame Turner  (the wife of the land agent  Frederick John Turner) and in November of the same year the hall was opened by The Bishop of Southwell and Lady Hoskyns

The large hall, costing £3,400, had a stage and a superb sprung parquet dance floor. By 1927 a sum of £2,200 had been raised and in order to meet the deficit of £1,200 a three day bazaar was held in November, 1927.

Then in 1993 money from the sale of glebe land was used to convert a dilapidated stone stable block into a coffee shop and drop-in-help centre which opened on 24th May 1993.   Also in 1993 a Scout Hut was built on part of Turner Hall Field and was dedicated to the memory of scout Mark Andrew Davies who died whilst on camp.

 The Parish Office, Lounge, Main Hall, Stable Centre and Scout Hut are interconnected and are all widely used.

Many groups and organisations hold their meetings in the Hall and on Saturday 1st March, 2008 a Centenary Celebration was held, with the various groups putting on displays and providing entertainment.

People were asked for their memories and this is what I submitted to The Old Mansfield Woodhouse Society who used it in their centenary display:

 MEMORIES OF THE TURNER MEMORIAL HALL 

by Margaret Morris (March 2008)

In 1933 my mother (maiden name Doris Pickering) went to a Dance at the Turner Memorial Hall with a friend of her sister. It was there that the friend Hilda Fairweather introduced her brother, Richard to her.

At that time, a whist drive was usually held in the lounge, whilst the dance took place in the main hall.

Doris and Richard (widely known as Dick) began courting and were married in 1934. I was born the following year.

Sadly my father died in 1963 aged 50 years, but my mother is still keeping fairly well at 93 years of age.

I feel the Hall has played, and is still playing, an important part in many people’s lives. It is in the centre of the village and a focal point where lots of activities regularly take place.

There is the big Christmas Event, the Summer Fair, the Friday Morning Flea Market, as well as numerous Church activities and coffee mornings. Band Concerts, Yoga, Keep Fit class and Line Dancing are amongst the many activities which I remember being held there.

The lounge is also used as a regular meeting room for many organisations such as the Old Woodhouse Society who have used it for their monthly meetings for many years and the main hall for many big fund raising events, including a Victorian Fair when we all dressed up in Victorian costume.

Although I cannot claim to have met my husband at a dance at the Turner Hall, we did host a Folk Dance/Supper there to celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary with help from the Mansfield Folk Dance Club, the late Arthur Froggatt being the caller.

My husband Keith attended the St. Edmund’s Youth Club at the Hall in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s, and also remembers when the lounge was turned into an overspill classroom for St. Edmund’s School when the school leaving age was raised from fourteen to fifteen in the late 1940’s.

The School also used the St. Edmund’s Football Field on a weekly basis for sports activities and when it was too wet to be outside the Hall was occasionally used for handball and P.T. and he can also remember the School play being held in the Hall and the Police Ball being held there.

I am sure that Mr. J. W. Turner would be pleased that the Hall built in his memory is still being used so regularly, but personally I am sorry that the name has recently had to be changed from Memorial to Community Hall in order to obtain extra funding. This means that another piece of history and the true meaning of the name of the Hall have been lost.

This page was added by Ann Sewell on 24/07/2014.
Comments about this page

I was surprised to see the photograph of the builders in front of the Hall when browsing connections with Mansfield Woodhouse. I have the same photograph, or rather a scanned image from the one owned by my fairly recently deceased father Jim Ellis. My great grandfather, stone mason Samuel Ellis, is fourth from the right on the back row. Another relative is front furthest right. From memory, I think that his name is/was Colin and would have been an uncle of some degree. I didn't know the date of the photograph until I spotted this article so that is useful input for the family tree that I work on. Samuel, his son Humphrey (my paternal grandfather), and my father worked on many buildings in Woodhouse as builders/masons for the Duke of Portland Estate. Clarkson's Hall for instance and my grandfather fetched the Horse Trough from the station after it was recovered and re-installed it near to it's original position at the junction of the A6075 Warsop Road? and Leeming Lane North. I would be interested to hear of anyone who knew the people that I've mentioned or who may have any relevant photographs.  

By Trevor Ellis
On 15/04/2015

Trevor! I am a member of the Old Woodhouse Society and also an Assistant Curator at the Heritage Link in Mansfield Woodhouse Library. This article was a project for us to prove to the Lottery Fund people we were giving value for money. If you live local, pop in Thursday morning or Friday all day where you will be most welcome to peruse our Archives.

Other projects were Manor House, Debdale Hall, Park Hall, Sherwood Colliery and Woodhouse b.c

[before coal]

By Tom Shead
On 17/04/2015

Hi Trevor! The trough was returned by Rouse's Lorry from Boreham Wood in Hertfordshire, we have the local newspaper cutting detailing the return. There is no mention of an Ellis involved, if you have any info on your relatives involvement let me know and we will include him in any writeups in the Heritage Link.

By Tom Shead
On 20/04/2015

Hi Trevor! The trough was returned by Rouse's Lorry from Boreham Wood in Hertfordshire, we have the local newspaper cutting detailing the return. There is no mention of an Ellis involved, if you have any info on your relatives involvement let me know and we will include him in any writeups in the Heritage Link.

By Tom Shead
On 20/04/2015

Hi Tom,

thank you very much for your offer for me to look at the archives and I will certainly take you up on that at some point. I don't live in the area but less than an hours drive away. Re. 'the trough' - I just remember my father saying to me that grand-dad had fetched the trough from the station. I don't know from where or how he understood that to be so. Unfortunately dad is no longer with us and so I can't question him further. Did Rouses collect it from the station or direct from Boreham Wood I wonder. Dad did seem pretty definite about it. He knew at least most of the farms in the Mansfield and Woodhouse area, how the flood dykes etc. worked and were connected in and around the area, the Yards, shopkeepers (By the way I have a copy (on my PC) of a photograph of dad as a boy standing outside of Mr Place's butchers shop with Mr Place if it's not already in the archive and would be of interest to you. The photograph shows all of the building frontage), Generally he had a wealth of knowledge of Woodhouse accumulated over his ninety four year life span. I only wish that I had recorded somehow the information that he used to trickle out.

By Trevor Ellis
On 27/04/2015

Hi Tom,

thank you very much for your offer for me to look at the archives and I will certainly take you up on that at some point. I don't live in the area but less than an hours drive away. Re. 'the trough' - I just remember my father saying to me that grand-dad had fetched the trough from the station. I don't know from where or how he understood that to be so. Unfortunately dad is no longer with us and so I can't question him further. Did Rouses collect it from the station or direct from Boreham Wood I wonder. Dad did seem pretty definite about it. He knew at least most of the farms in the Mansfield and Woodhouse area, how the flood dykes etc. worked and were connected in and around the area, the Yards, shopkeepers (By the way I have a copy (on my PC) of a photograph of dad as a boy standing outside of Mr Place's butchers shop with Mr Place if it's not already in the archive and would be of interest to you. The photograph shows all of the building frontage), Generally he had a wealth of knowledge of Woodhouse accumulated over his ninety four year life span. I only wish that I had recorded somehow the information that he used to trickle out.

By Trevor Ellis
On 27/04/2015

Hi, to add more history - my grandfathers grandfather a William Treweek, was the verger for St. Edmunds and he and his family resided in Turner hall during that period.

By Tom Lee
On 20/09/2017

Hi Tom! I am a member of the Old Woodhouse Society and we have the Heritage Link in Woodhouse Library. Mr Treweek is a name familiar to us as we have Parish Magazines etc If you have any photod of your ancestor we would love copies.

By Tom Shead
On 25/09/2017

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